Monday, November 7, 2016

Crystal Collier & Symbolism





Please welcome my blog-buddy Crystal Collier here today to share her new book
and some little known facts about her books!

In 1771, Alexia had everything: the man of her dreams, reconciliation with her father, even a child on the way. But she was never meant to stay. It broke her heart, but Alexia heeded destiny and traveled five hundred years back to stop the Soulless from becoming.

In the thirteenth century, the Holy Roman Church has ordered the Knights Templar to exterminate the Passionate, her bloodline. As Alexia fights this new threat—along with an unfathomable evil and her own heart—the Soulless genesis nears. But none of her hard-won battles may matter if she dies in childbirth before completing her mission.

Can Alexia escape her own clock?

BUY: Amazon | B&N

GUEST POST

Thank you Jemi for having me here today.

Symbolism is a powerful thing. People say they love my covers, so today I thought I'd share some of the hidden (or not so hidden) symbolism in them.

In Moonless, there are two clocks. One is in the Greek alphabet--to represent an ancient or timeless gift. The number of clocks on the covers of these books indicates where the story falls in the series timeline. Moonless starts in 1768. Sequentially, this is the middle time era in the story line.

Close ups. You'll notice that progressively we get a larger and larger perspective of Alexia, as her life, abilities, and vision expands. In Moonless we are up close, viewing what Alexia sees in the mirror the night her world is thrown into confusion. (The night she abruptly changes from ghastly to beautiful.)

In the animated version of the book, the title is constantly changing color, just as Alexia's life and perception of her world is constantly in flux.

I'm going to let you in on a little secret. My cover designer said this one was a total accident. He was fixing something when one of the clocks landed in the wrong place. He sat back and thought, "Huh." The mistake stuck.

In Soulless, there are three clocks. This story starts in 1771, the latest dot on the timeline. If you'll notice, the main clock is backwards, as Alexia learns how to reverse the clock. The small clock is handless, symbolizing her power that waits to be controlled.

She holds a sword for obvious reasons, since the war between the Passionate and Soulless has begun. And, as you'd assume from the dress, there is at least a wedding...thus the church stairs in the background.

We are further back from Alexia. She now understands her world and the part she plays in it, but she's not done learning.

The title bleeds smoke, just like the Soulless.

This was the cover my designer struggled with the most. He made 3 breathtaking mock ups, but they were all wrong--like the wrong genre. (He was in a mood.) I decided to give him a hand and hopped on a stock image site. I created some (very) rough mock ups to give him my thoughts, and that was all he needed.



You'll notice in Timeless, the grim background has disappeared, replaced by space. Alexia's hands are now the clock hands, and if you look closely, you'll see that she is controlling time.

There is only one clock. This story is in the mid 1200's, and thus the first in the timeline.

The clock is metaphysical. It only exists in our perception.

The title is broken, or rather, shattered. I'd explain the symbolism behind that one, but I don't want to give anything away. (And no, it's not what you're thinking.)

My cover designer had this one conceptualized the first time he heard the summary for the book. He ignored any suggestions I offered, saying, "I have this." He certainly did. This is the most beautiful cover in the series if you ask me, which is appropriate considering the way the series ends.

And there you have it. Do you see symbolism in book covers? Do you see it in life?


Crystal Collier is an eclectic author who pens clean fantasy/sci-fi, historical, and romance stories with the occasional touch of humor, horror, or inspiration. She practices her brother-induced ninja skills while teaching children or madly typing about fantastic and impossible creatures. She has lived from coast to coast and now calls Florida home with her creative husband, four littles, and “friend” (a.k.a. the zombie locked in her closet). Secretly, she dreams of world domination and a bottomless supply of cheese.

(Email address is required for awarding prizes.)


Thank you for visiting Crystal! I loved learning about the cover - it's all in the awesome details!
I don't always see the symbolism in the covers until AFTER I've read the book - love finding those details then.

How about you? Do you enjoy finding the symbolism in covers?

33 comments:

  1. Wow, so much thought went into the covers. Smart illustrator.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Very nice. Congratulations, Crystal!

    ReplyDelete
  3. How interesting about your awesome covers, especially how one of them was created by a mistake that stuck. Congrats on your new book!

    ReplyDelete
  4. That is so cool! Thanks for sharing. I love symbolism--even if I don't see ti right away.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. LOL. The best symbolism is the kind that sits in your subconscious and comes to mean something over time.

      Delete
  5. Yet another lovely appearance today! Congrats again.

    ReplyDelete
  6. That is so cool. I often try to look for symbolism on the covers of books I read. Before I became a writer, I don't know if I would have done that.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Right? That's why I'm glad I have a cover artist who works so closely with me and incorporates my thoughts.

      Delete
  7. Beautiful covers, very thoughtful. I don't usually look for symbolism on the covers; it just happens to hit me after I read the book.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know, right? When you see all the parts coming into play?

      Delete
  8. I love the cover. It just grabs your attention and won't let go. Congratulations, Crystal.

    Hi, Jemi!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much! I lucked out in the cover designer department.

      Delete
  9. Wow, I never realized there was so much symbolism in your covers, Crystal. Very cool. It was especially fun to see the mock-ups you did for the second book!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Heather. Yeah--they're very revealing of the process, eh? Or the feel of the book. One of the two.

      Delete
  10. Wow! Love the covers and the symbolism behind them.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Symbolism is everywhere when we look and I love it when creatives spend the extra time to make sure it's in their stories.

    ReplyDelete
  12. My favorite part about the symbolism of your covers is how we see more of Alexia each cover. THAT is brilliant. :) Christy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! Yeah, that was totally my cover designer's genius.

      Delete
  13. Hi Jemi! Hi Crystal! Yes, Crystal, your covers are beyond awesome, and i loved reading the symbolism behind them.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Sometimes mistakes lead to the best ideas. Congratulations, Crystal.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Wow, I can't believe I missed so much of the symbolism in your covers. Thanks for the eye-opening. (Hi Jemi.)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You know, I'm betting most book covers are like that and we just don't know the story behind them.

      Delete